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Howe Cup US Women’s Team Champions

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Howe
Cup US Women’s Team Champions
Year
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
College Team
Princeton
Princeton
Princeton
Princeton
Yale
Princeton
Princeton
Princeton
Princeton
Coach
Betty Constable
Betty Constable
Betty Constable
Betty Constable
Marion Freeman
Betty Constable
Betty Constable
Betty Constable
Betty Constable
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
Harvard
Princeton
Princeton
Harvard
Yale
Harvard
Harvard
Princeton
Harvard
Princeton
Pris Choate
Betty Constable
Betty Constable
Pris Choate
Dale Walker
Steve Piltch
Steve Piltch
Betty Constable
Steve Piltch
Betty Constable

1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999

Yale
Harvard
Harvard
Harvard
Harvard
Harvard
Princeton
Princeton
Dale Walker
Bill Doyle
Bill Doyle
Bill Doyle
Bill Doyle
Bill Doyle
Gail Ramsay
Gail Ramsay
2000
2001
2002
Penn
Harvard
Trinity
Demer Holleran
Satinder Bajwa
Wendy Bartlett

 

 

History
of the Howe Cup

reprinted from USWISRA

The non-intercollegiate Howe
Cup is one of the oldest and most treasured prizes in all of women’s
squash in the USA. Originally an inter-city competition among teams
from New York, Boston, and Philadelphia metropolitan areas, the Howe
Cup has grown into a national competition with both inter-city and intercollegiate
divisions. Virginia
Griggs donated the original trophy in honor of the Howe family: Margaret
A. Howe, the U.S. Champion in 1929, ’32, and ’34; her twin daughters,
Betty Howe Constable, the U.S. Champion in 1950, ’56. ’57, ’58, and
’59, and Peggy Howe White, the U.S. champion in 1952 and ’53. (photo
right: Betty Howe Constable)

In 1955, the New Haven Lawn
Club played host to the first inter-cities competition. Over the next
few years, the Howe Cup broadened its field to includ teams from nearly
every area of the country with players in three divisions of varying
abilities. Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Washington DC, and Seattle
have now hosted the women’s non-intercollegiate division.

The intercollegiate division
of the Howe Cup began in 1973 as the brain-child of Princeton Coach
Betty Howe Constable and University of Pennsylvania coach Ann Wetzel,
U.S. champion in 1964. Margaret A. Howe donated the trophy for the intercollegiate
division. Yale was selected as the host university and it has been held
there every year until 1999, when it moved to Harvard University for
the first time.

In the first years of competition
wehn only ten schools participated, each school could send an “A” team
of five players and a “B” team of three players. Not all schools sent
a “B” team. As the number of schools grew, the Howe Cup was changed
to one team of seven players per school with the option to bring one
substitute.

In 1990, the current format
of nine players and one substitute per school was adopted to reflect
the growth in the sport and the change in the intercollegiate dual-match
formats. In 1998, the round-robin format was abandoned by divisions
A and B in favor of seeded draws of 8 with consolation rounds. In 1999,
division C changed to the draw format as well instead of a round robin.

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This page last updated 26-May-2002